Fatigue

10 Posts | Page(s): 1 

Fatigue

by Asmaallahnairi on Tue Sep 01, 2015 05:11 PM

Quote | Reply

Hello everyone 

I just finished my chemotherapy. I had an ovarian cancer 1 stage 3 degree. I had 3 session of chemotherapy. I know that my question may seem too early to ask as I just finished chemo this month but I'm really worried. I feel so tired I almost sleep 12h daily and I can barely stand up. I know it is gonna get better by time. But how long will it take? I'm so worried . I used to be a hyperactive person sleeping 5h a day and I really want my energy back. 

Do you think with this condition it would take long time ? The doctor said in one month you will get back to your normal status but honestly he said other things that did not come true :D 

RE: Fatigue

by plines on Wed Sep 02, 2015 07:27 PM

Quote | Reply

Time, time, time.  Your body has just been bombarded with "poison" to kill the cancer. Which by itself would cause fatigue since chemotherapy unfortunately doesn't just kill cancer cells.  Healing takes rest. Don't be afraid to rest!  When I finished my treatment (radiation & chemo) I too was done in. My physician sent a physical therapist to start me on a regime of strengthening exercises, increasing as I re-build muscle and energy.  Set small goals each day....walk 1 block for a couple of days, then 2 blocks, etc.  If you have ever worked with free weights start with 1 lb. dumbells and graduate as your strength increases.  Moving your body increases endorphins which also help fending off the "tired" feeling"  Doctors live and die by statistics which are "averages"  if getting back to normal takes longer than 1 month for you, so what. You have the rest of your life!

Good Luck

RE: Fatigue

by greatgramsjan on Wed Sep 02, 2015 07:43 PM

Quote | Reply

On Sep 01, 2015 5:11 PM Asmaallahnairi wrote:

Hello everyone 

I just finished my chemotherapy. I had an ovarian cancer 1 stage 3 degree. I had 3 session of chemotherapy. I know that my question may seem too early to ask as I just finished chemo this month but I'm really worried. I feel so tired I almost sleep 12h daily and I can barely stand up. I know it is gonna get better by time. But how long will it take? I'm so worried . I used to be a hyperactive person sleeping 5h a day and I really want my energy back. 

Do you think with this condition it would take long time ? The doctor said in one month you will get back to your normal status but honestly he said other things that did not come true :D 

Hi, I just finished my 6th round of chemo (Avastin and 5 FU) and this is the second time I have had chemo so I can tell you that it will take a few weeks to get over the  tired feelings. Some days are good and some day are bad.

Go with the flow and do what you can when you can !!!  Some people  get over it quickly and some don't. Each person is different.  

RE: Fatigue

by Patcarl112004 on Wed Sep 02, 2015 08:58 PM

Quote | Reply

Time is in your favor.......do what your body tells you and don't feel guilty about it at all.  I had chemo and radiation for Carcinosarcoma uterine cancer 2 years ago and some days I still feel tired. My sleep pattern has change as well and if I get 5 hours a night I feel blessed.

Be aware that having those treatments can cause you to later get Lymphodema in your legs.  I have it in one leg and found a therapist who specializes in that and it has made all the difference in the world.  My doctor never warned me about this possibility.

RE: Fatigue

by jance on Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:09 PM

Quote | Reply

I had stage 3 breast cancer last year.  Fortunately, between my mastectomy and starting chemo & radiotherapy, we bought two rescue dogs.  Not only did it keep my mind off the treatment, as we had to work out their issues and how to deal with them, it got me out walking and enjoying the outdoors.  I believe keeping fit and eating well helped me through the 6 months of chemo (yes I had some days where I had to rest).  I also treated myself to a couple of holidays between treatments.  The doctors weren't so happy about that but I found it essential to my psychological self and to feel I had some control over what I needed.  I also drank at least 6 glasses of water a day to flush the drugs quickly after the sessions.  Good luck and enjoy life.

RE: Fatigue

by vanisle on Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:21 PM

Quote | Reply
Listen well to what "plines" says to you. Chemo tiredness can take a year to vacate your body. Help it out the door by cat naps and some exercise. That's what we're being told now - have a nap but still get up and do something. Move around in small steps for a little bit - dust your house or vacuum. Just keep "living". Don't lay down for hours and hours and weaken your body. It gets easier week by week and you will feel like doing more, week by week. Look at it as letting the chemo know whose really in control!

RE: Fatigue

by npride on Thu Sep 03, 2015 04:08 AM

Quote | Reply

Hi, hang in there!  Be patient with yourself, it can be a long process returning to your normal lifestyle.  If you feel like it's taking too long (and it may take many months) you should talk to your PCP.  There are a lot of long term side effects to chemo that are not generally talked about during treatment as the focus is on getting rid of the cancer!!  Now your focus, thankfully, can turn to getting on with life as best as you can!  Some bits of advice from this 35 year survivor...(currently receiving chemo again)...

* try to be patient with yourself.  The human body is able to withstand amazing things and recover, but needs TIME

* your previous active lifestyle is a big plus as it gave your body the necessary reserves and stamina for your battle with cancer, you now have to replenish your reserves!

    *eat healthy  *rest often  *stay as active          as you can, exercise doe help!

* be willing to accept what comes...even if this is the new 'norm' it is still a gift from God.  You are now a survivor!

* educate yourself on long-term survivorship issues.  There's a lot of information out there.

*sometimes very simple things can help A LOT with fatigue (vitamin D, for example).  Your PCP can help identify possible causes if the fatigue continues.

*one of the most common long-term effects of chemotherapy is fatigue.  

God bless, and good luck!

     *

RE: Fatigue

by HILLY on Thu Sep 03, 2015 09:03 AM

Quote | Reply

I know how you feel! I also never used to sit down and now need 12 hours a day sleep, more if I do any housework or potter round the garden. i wasn't too bad after my chemo but I had a bone marrow transplant a month ago and that has wiped out my energy. I suppose I shouldn't be surprised as we are trying the rebuild so many cells, its like early pregnancy I guess. I've decided to just follow my body and if it says you need to go to bed or have a doze on the sofa, then I'm doing just that!

Worying won't help, but glucose and extra sugar might? It says in a booklet that I've got that its usually 3 months before i could go back to work part time, so that suggests it'll take longer than a month :-(. Take care of yourself, Love Hx

RE: Fatigue

by davezuro on Fri Sep 04, 2015 01:11 PM

Quote | Reply

According to Robert Wright of the American Anti-Cancer Institute here are a few things he recommends.

- Drink alkaline water of 9.5 ph                                           - Change your diet - avoid foods with sugar; no starch; no bread and eat raw vegetables. Eat fish - like salmon.           -Consume a bioavailable nutritional supplement to get the extra nutrients your body needs to strengthen yourself and your immune system.                                                       - Try and exercise about 30 min. each day.  

Go to:  www.americanaci.org       

RE: Fatigue

by davezuro on Mon Sep 21, 2015 09:14 PM

Quote | Reply

Found this report on a website and thought to share it.

It is titled "Radiation Induced Fatigue"

https://reliv-static.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/migrate/prod

10 Posts | Page(s): 1 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.