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USE A SAFE WATER SUPPLY

by Goodbook - May 29 at 2:48 PM

A glass of clean water and pieces of lemon Obtaining sufficient clean water for one’s family is a regular chore in some countries. Yet, access to clean water can become a concern in any part of the world when a main supply that is usually good to drink becomes contaminated as a result of a flood, a storm, a pipe break, or some other issue. If water does not come from a safe source or is not stored correctly, it can cause parasite infestation, as well as cholera, life-threatening diarrhea, typhoid, hepatitis, and other infections. Unsafe drinking water is one of the causes of an estimated 1.7 billion cases of diarrheal disease every year. There is much you can do to slow down or prevent the onset of illness Cholera is most often contracted when a person drinks water or eats food that is contaminated with fecal matter from infected people. What steps can you take to protect yourself, even in the immediate aftermath of a disaster, from this and other types of water contamination? Ensure that all your drinking water—including the water used for brushing teeth, making ice, washing food and dishes, or cooking—comes from a safe source, such as an adequately treated public supply or sealed bottles from a reputable firm. If there is any possibility that your piped supply has been contaminated, boil your water before use or treat it with an appropriate chemical product. When using chemicals, such as chlorine or water-purifying tablets, follow the maker’s directions carefully. Use quality water filters, if available and affordable. If no water-treatment products are available, add household bleach, eight drops per gallon of water (two drops per liter), mix well, and then let the water stand for 30 minutes before using it. Always store treated water in clean, covered containers to protect it from possible recontamination. Ensure that any vessel used to take water from your stored supply, such as a ladle, is clean. Handle water containers with clean hands, and do not dip your hands or fingers into water used for drinking.

CHRONIC ILL HEALTH OR DISABILITY CAN HAVE A MAJOR IMPACT ON A PERSON’S LIFE. After becoming physically paralyzed, a once active and healthy man named Ulf said: “I became deeply depressed. My strength, courage, and power drained away . . . I felt ‘destroyed.’”

Ulf’s experience reminds us that none of us have complete control over our health. Still, we can take reasonable measures to reduce the risk of ill health. But what if our health deteriorates? Does that doom us to unhappiness? Not at all, as we shall see. First, though, let us consider some principles that promote good health.

BE “MODERATE IN HABITS.” Habitually eating or drinking to excess is obviously bad for our health?—not to mention our finances! “Do not be among those who drink too much wine, among those who gorge themselves on meat, for a drunkard and a glutton will come to poverty.”?—

DO NOT POLLUTE YOUR BODY. “Let us cleanse ourselves of every defilement of flesh and spirit.” People defile their bodies when they chew or smoke tobacco or abuse alcohol or drugs. Smoking, for example, “leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body,” says the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

VIEW YOUR BODY AND YOUR LIFE AS PRECIOUS GIFTS. “By our father  we have life and move and exist.”Appreciating that fact moves us to avoid taking needless risks, whether we are at work, driving, or choosing our recreation. A momentary thrill is not worth a life of disability!

CONTROL NEGATIVE EMOTIONS. Your mind and body are closely linked. So try to avoid undue anxiety, unbridled anger, envy, and other harmful emotions. “Let go of anger and abandon rage,” We also read: “Never be anxious  about the next day, for the next day will have its own anxieties.”?—

TRY TO FOCUS ON POSITIVE THOUGHTS. “A calm heart gives life to the body,”  : “A joyful heart is good medicine.” That is a scientifically sound statement. “If you are happy,” said a doctor in Scotland, “you are likely in the future to have less in the way of physical illness than those who are unhappy.”

BUILD RESILIENCE. Like Ulf, mentioned earlier, we may have no choice but to endure a persistent trial. Still, we can choose how we endure. Some become overwhelmed with discouragement, which may only make matters worse. “If you become discouraged in the day of distress, your strength will be meager,”

Others, perhaps after initial feelings of despair, bounce back. They adapt. They find ways to cope. That was the case with Ulf. He said that after much prayer and meditation on the Bible’s positive message, he “started to see opportunities instead of obstacles.” Moreover, like many who undergo major trials, he learned valuable lessons in compassion and empathy, which moved him to share the Bible’s comforting message with others.

Another person who suffered greatly was a man named Steve. At age 15, he had an accident that paralyzed him from the neck down. By the time he was 18, he had regained the use of his arms. He then went to a university, where his life spiraled into drugs, alcohol, and sexual immorality. He had no hope?—until he began to study the Bible, which gave him a new outlook on life and helped him to conquer his bad habits. “The emptiness that I had felt for so long was no longer there,” he said. “My life is now filled with peace, happiness, and contentment.”

Steve and Ulf’s comments call to mind  “The law of Jehovah is perfect, restoring strength. . . . The orders from Jehovah are righteous, causing the heart to rejoice; the commandment of Jehovah is clean, making the eyes shine.”

if you would like to hear more comforting thoughts on a regular basis.  Contact me ....

Good Health is it impossible?

by Goodbook - May 17 at 3:50 PM

Good health is impossible without good nutrition, and for good nutrition you need a healthy, balanced diet. You may need to consider your intake of salt, fats, and sugar, and you should watch your portion sizes. Include fruits and vegetables in your diet, and vary what you eat. Reading the packaging will help you to select whole-grain foods when buying bread, cereals, pasta, or rice. These are richer in nutrients and fiber than the alternatives made from refined grain. As for proteins, eat small and lean portions of meat and poultry and try to eat fish a couple of times a week, if possible. In some lands it is also possible to find protein-rich foods from vegetable sources.

If you eat too many sugars and solid fats, you risk becoming overweight. To minimize this risk, drink water instead of sweet beverages. Eat more fruit instead of sugary desserts. Limit your intake of solid fats from such items as sausages, meat, butter, cakes, cheese, and cookies. And instead of using solid fats for cooking, you may want to use healthier oils.

Too much salt, or sodium, in the diet can raise your blood pressure to an unhealthy level. If this is your problem, use the information on food packaging to keep your sodium intake low. Instead of salt, use herbs and spices to flavor your meals.

How much you eat can be as important as what you eat. So, while enjoying your food, do not keep eating after you are no longer hungry.

An issue tied to nutrition is the risk of food poisoning. Any food can poison you if it is not prepared and stored properly. Every year, 1 out of every 6 Americans falls sick from food poisoning. Most recover without lasting ill effects, but some die from it. What can you do to minimize the risk?

  • Vegetables grow in soil that may have been treated with manure, so wash these items carefully before preparing them.

  • Wash your hands, cutting board, utensils, dishes, and countertops with hot, soapy water before preparing each item.

  • To avoid cross-contamination, never put food on a surface or plate that was previously in contact with raw eggs, poultry, meat, or fish, without first washing that surface.

  • Cook until the food reaches the right temperature, and promptly refrigerate any perishable items that are not going to be eaten immediately.

  • Discard perishable items left at room temperature for more than two hours or one hour if air temperature exceeds 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32°C).

    If you want to know more just let me know.     

Epidemic-Will it stop?

by Goodbook - May 10 at 3:29 PM

IT IS 1997. A scientist sits in the small Eskimo village of Brevig on the frozen tundra of the Seward Peninsula of Alaska. In front of him is the exhumed body of a young woman that he and four Eskimo helpers have dug out of the permafrost. She fell victim to the flu back in 1918 and has lain there, frozen, ever since.

What good can come from examining her now? The scientist hopes that the flu-causing agent is still in her lungs and that through the use of advanced genetic techniques, it can be isolated and identified. Why might that knowledge prove helpful? To answer, we need to understand a little more about how viruses work and what makes them so dangerous.

A Virus That Can Be Deadly

Today we know that influenza is caused by a virus and that it can be spread from person to person in respiratory secretions expelled by coughing, sneezing, and talking. * It is present worldwide even in the Tropics, where it can strike year-round. In the Northern Hemisphere, flu season runs from November to March; and in the Southern Hemisphere, from April to September.

Influenza type A, the most dangerous type of flu virus, is small in size compared with many viruses. It is usually spherical, with projections from its surface. When this virus infects a human cell, it reproduces so rapidly that often within about ten hours, a swarm of between 100,000 and a million new influenza virus “copies” explode from the cell.

The scary characteristic of this simple organism is its ability to change quickly. Because the virus reproduces so rapidly (far faster than the HIV virus), its many “copies” are not exact. Some are different enough to escape the immune system. That is why we face different flu viruses every year, which present a new set of antigens?—substances that test our immunity. If the antigen changes sufficiently, our immune system has little defense against it and there is risk of a pandemic.

Furthermore, flu viruses also infect animals, and therein lies a problem for humans. The pig, it is believed, can be a host for  viruses that infect such birds as chickens and ducks. But it can also be the host for other viruses that infect humans.

Therefore, if a pig becomes infected by both types of viruses?—one sort that infects animals and another sort common to humans—?the genes of the two strains can get mixed together. The result can be a totally new strain of influenza, one to which humans have no immunity. Some feel that farming communities where poultry, swine, and people live in close proximity?—as is often the case in Asia, for example—?are likely sources of new flu strains.

Why Did It Become So Virulent?

The question is, What could have caused the flu virus of 1918-19 to turn into a pneumonia-causing killer of young people? Though none of the live virus is left from that time, scientists have long felt that if they could find a frozen specimen of it, they might be able to isolate intact RNA and discover what made this strain so lethal. Actually, to some extent they have succeeded.

Thanks to the frozen Alaskan specimen described at the outset of this article, a team of scientists has been able to identify and sequence most of the genes of the 1918-19 flu virus. However, scientists have still not figured out what caused that flu to be such a killer. Apparently, though, this strain was a relative of a flu virus that infects both pigs and birds.

Could It Come Back?

According to many experts, it is not a question of if such a vicious flu virus will return but of when and how it will return. In fact, some expect a significant new influenza outbreak every 11 years or so and a severe one approximately every 30 years. According to these predictions, mankind is overdue for another pandemic.

The medical journal Vaccine reported in 2003: “It has been 35 years since the last influenza pandemic, and the longest interval between pandemics recorded with certainty is 39 years.” The article continued: “The pandemic virus may emerge in China or a nearby country and could include surface antigens  or virulence factors derived from animal influenza viruses.”

The Vaccine article predicted concerning the virus: “It will spread rapidly throughout the world. Several waves of infection will occur. Morbidity will be extensive in all age groups, and there will be widespread disruption of social and economic activity in all countries. Excess mortality will be evident in most if not all age groups. It is unlikely that health care systems in even the most economically developed countries will be able to adequately cope with the demand for health care services.”

Just how alarming is such a scenario? John M. Barry, author of the book The Great Influenza, provides this perspective: “A terrorist with a nuclear weapon is every national politician’s nightmare. A new influenza pandemic should be.”

What Treatments Are Available?

You may ask, ‘Aren’t there effective treatments now?’ The answer involves both good news and bad. Antibiotics can cut the mortality from secondary bacterial pneumonias, and certain medications can be effective against some flu strains. There are immunizations that can be helpful in combating a flu virus if the correct strains of it are identified and if the immunizations can be produced in time. Such is the good news. The bad?

The history of flu immunizations?—from the ill-fated swine flu episode of 1976 to the production shortage of 2004—?has been spotty. Even though medical science has realized momentous advancements since World War I, doctors still do not know of any cure for a powerful virus.

Hence, there is this disquieting question: Could there be a repeat of 1918-19? Note what is said in a paper from London’s National Institute for Medical Research: “In some ways, conditions prevail as they did in 1918: there is a huge volume of international travel due to the development of transport, there are a number of war-zones with their inherent problems of malnutrition and poor hygiene, the world population has grown to six and a half billion and a greater proportion of this population is living in urban situations many of which have decaying infrastructures in terms of waste disposal.”

Concludes a well-respected U.S. authority: “Put simply, each year brings us closer to the next pandemic.” Does all this mean, though, that the future is bleak, even hopeless? No!

Question: What can I do to help protect the health and safety of myself and others?

Answer: Stay home as much as possible.

The CDC states that “the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.” It further states that “the virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person” between “people who are in close contact with one another.” Therefore, for the safety of yourself and others, consider keeping physically separate from those not living inside your home to the degree possible, limiting any activity outside your home to only essential matters that affect the life of you or those in your household. The CDC also recommends that you “clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily.”

Question: If I must go out in public, what specific precautions can I take?

Answer: Maintain social distancing and clean your hands frequently.

Limiting the frequency of going out in public is the best option. However, when doing so is necessary, the CDC recommends putting “distance between yourself and other people.” Social distancing involves maintaining at least 6 feet of separation between you and those not living in your home with you, including when standing in lines. In addition, be conscious of touch surfaces and avoid touching your face. The CDC further recommends cleaning your hands often. Frequently wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer may be used in addition to hand washing or if soap and water are not readily available.

Question: Should I wear a face mask? If so, what type should be used?

Answer: A face covering is recommended in public settings.

The CDC recommends “wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission,” and further states that "Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low

         

cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure." The CDC also suggests that during this time of shortage “surgical masks or N-95 respirators be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders.”

PS: please,reply if I can share a scripture thought.    As to what the ancient proverb gives us encouragement to life's anxieties.

Sleeping?????((

by Goodbook - April 28 at 5:41 PM

The amount of sleep needed varies from person to person. Most newborns sleep for 16 to 18 hours a day, toddlers about 14 hours, and preschoolers about 11 or 12. School-age children generally need at least 10 hours of sleep, adolescents perhaps 9 or 10, and adults from 7 to 8.

Getting the right amount of rest should not be considered optional. According to experts, sufficient sleep is important for:

  • Growth and development in children and teenagers.

  • Learning and retention of new information.

  • Maintaining the right balance of hormones that impact metabolism and weight.

  • Cardiovascular health.

  • Disease prevention.

Insufficient sleep has been linked to obesity, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and tragic accidents. Surely these give us good reason to want to get enough rest.

So, what can you do if you realize that you have a problem getting enough sleep?

  • Try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day.

  • Make your bedroom quiet, dark, relaxing, and neither too warm nor too cold.

  • Do not watch TV or use gadgets while in bed.

  • Make your bed as comfortable as possible.

  • Avoid heavy meals, caffeine, and alcohol before bedtime.

  • If after applying these suggestions you still suffer from insomnia or other sleep disorders—such as excessive daytime sleepiness or gasping for breath while sleeping—you may want to consult a qualified health-care professional.

SAFEGUARD YOUR HEALTH!

Your health is affected by realities over which you have no control—such as economic conditions, the availability of resources, and so on. In all likelihood, however, it should be within your means to adopt at least some of the suggestions given in the foregoing article. As a wise man of ancient times put it, “the shrewd one sees the danger and conceals himself.”

Isolation being reasonable...

by Goodbook - April 18 at 3:37 PM

Are you feeling isolated and lonely? If so, you may feel as did the psalmist who said: “I am like a solitary bird on a roof.” The Goodbook wisdom can help you to deal with problems that are caused by isolation.

  •  Pursue spiritual growth

  •  Read comforting Bible passages

  •  Understand the meaning of world events

  •  Avoid needless anxiety

  •  Culti Are you feeling isolated and lonely? If so, you may feel as did the psalmist who said: “I am like a solitary bird on a roof.” The Goodbook  wisdom can help you to deal with problems that are caused by isolation.

    •  Pursue spiritual growth

    •  Read comforting passages

    •  Understand the meaning of world events

    •  Avoid needless anxiety

    •  Cultivate friendships

    •  Stay physically active

     Pursue spiritual growth

    Even while you are isolated, you can find happiness by being aware of your spiritual need and filling it. Cultivate friendships

  •  Stay physically active

 Pursue spiritual growth

Even while you are isolated, you can find happiness by being aware of your spiritual need and filling it.

if you want to converse with me.  Feel free to drop me a message....

Cancer soon to be eradicated.....

by Goodbook - April 12 at 4:04 PM

By the year 2100 advances in basic research in biology may permit prevention of cancer by means now utterly unforeseen.”?—The Causes of Cancer. ACCORDING to Bible prophecy, cancer will cease even sooner, and certainly “by means now utterly unforeseen” by the writers of the above-quoted book. Why do we make that assertion? Because Christ Jesus, sent to the earth over 1,900 years ago, was empowered to restore life and health to mankind. On one occasion, without even seeing the patient, he cured a Roman army officer’s manservant who was “laid up in the house with paralysis, being terribly tormented.” On another occasion, he cured his disciple Peter’s mother-in-law, who was sick with fever. How did he do it? “He touched her hand, and the fever left her, and she got up.”?

Good Health For You!

by Goodbook - April 05 at 4:09 PM

1 PRACTICE GOOD HYGIENE

According to the Mayo Clinic, “one of the best ways to avoid getting sick and spreading illness” is to wash your hands. One of the easiest ways to catch a cold or influenza is to rub your nose or your eyes when your hands have been contaminated by germs. Your best defense against such contamination is to wash your hands regularly. Good hygiene can also prevent the spread of more serious conditions, such as pneumonia and diarrheal diseases, which every year cause the death of over two million children under the age of five. Even the spread of deadly Ebola can be minimized by the simple habit of washing hands.

There are certain times when hand washing is particularly important to protect your own health and that of others. You should wash your hands:

  • After using the toilet.

  • After changing diapers or helping a child to use the toilet.

  • Before and after treating a wound or a cut.

  • Before and after being with someone who is sick.

  • Before preparing, serving, or eating food.

  • After sneezing, coughing, or blowing your nose.

  • After touching an animal or animal waste.

  • After handling garbage.

And do not take it for granted that you are cleaning your hands properly. Studies have shown that a large percentage of those who use public toilets do not wash their hands afterward or do not wash them correctly. How should you wash your hands?

  • Wet your hands in clean running water and apply soap.

  • Rub your hands together to make a lather, not forgetting to clean your nails, your thumbs, the backs of your hands, and between your fingers.

  • Keep rubbing for at least 20 seconds.

  • Rinse in clean running water.

  • Dry with a clean cloth or a paper towel.

Such measures are simple but can avert illness and save lives.

 2 USE A SAFE WATER SUPPLY

Obtaining sufficient clean water for one’s family is a regular chore in some countries. Yet, access to clean water can become a concern in any part of the world when a main supply that is usually good to drink becomes contaminated as a result of a flood, a storm, a pipe break, or some other issue. If water does not come from a safe source or is not stored correctly, it can cause parasite infestation, as well as cholera, life-threatening diarrhea, typhoid, hepatitis, and other infections. Unsafe drinking water is one of the causes of an estimated 1.7 billion cases of diarrheal disease every year.

There is much you can do to slow down or prevent the onset of illness

Cholera is most often contracted when a person drinks water or eats food that is contaminated with fecal matter from infected people. What steps can you take to protect yourself, even in the immediate aftermath of a disaster, from this and other types of water contamination?

  • Ensure that all your drinking water—including the water used for brushing teeth, making ice, washing food and dishes, or cooking—comes from a safe source, such as an adequately treated public supply or sealed bottles from a reputable firm.

  • If there is any possibility that your piped supply has been contaminated, boil your water before use or treat it with an appropriate chemical product.

  • When using chemicals, such as chlorine or water-purifying tablets, follow the maker’s directions carefully.

  • Use quality water filters, if available and affordable.

  • If no water-treatment products are available, add household bleach, eight drops per gallon of water (two drops per liter), mix well, and then let the water stand for 30 minutes before using it.

  • Always store treated water in clean, covered containers to protect it from possible recontamination.

  • Ensure that any vessel used to take water from your stored supply, such as a ladle, is clean.

  • Handle water containers with clean hands, and do not dip your hands or fingers into water used for drinking.

 3 WATCH WHAT YOU EAT

Good health is impossible without good nutrition, and for good nutrition you need a healthy, balanced diet. You may need to consider your intake of salt, fats, and sugar, and you should watch your portion sizes. Include fruits and vegetables in your diet, and vary what you eat. Reading the packaging will help you to select whole-grain foods when buying bread, cereals, pasta, or rice. These are richer in nutrients and fiber than the alternatives made from refined grain. As for proteins, eat small and lean portions of meat and poultry and try to eat fish a couple of times a week, if possible. In some lands it is also possible to find protein-rich foods from vegetable sources.

If you eat too many sugars and solid fats, you risk becoming overweight. To minimize this risk, drink water instead of sweet beverages. Eat more fruit instead of sugary desserts. Limit your intake of solid fats from such items as sausages, meat, butter, cakes, cheese, and cookies. And instead of using solid fats for cooking, you may want to use healthier oils.

Too much salt, or sodium, in the diet can raise your blood pressure to an unhealthy level. If this is your problem, use the information on food packaging to keep your sodium intake low. Instead of salt, use herbs and spices to flavor your meals.

How much you eat can be as important as what you eat. So, while enjoying your food, do not keep eating after you are no longer hungry.

An issue tied to nutrition is the risk of food poisoning. Any food can poison you if it is not prepared and stored properly. Every year, 1 out of every 6 Americans falls sick from food poisoning. Most recover without lasting ill effects, but some die from it. What can you do to minimize the risk?

  • Vegetables grow in soil that may have been treated with manure, so wash these items carefully before preparing them.

  • Wash your hands, cutting board, utensils, dishes, and countertops with hot, soapy water before preparing each item.

  • To avoid cross-contamination, never put food on a surface or plate that was previously in contact with raw eggs, poultry, meat, or fish, without first washing that surface.

  • Cook until the food reaches the right temperature, and promptly refrigerate any perishable items that are not going to be eaten immediately.

  • Discard perishable items left at room temperature for more than two hours or one hour if air temperature exceeds 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32°C).

 4 STAY PHYSICALLY ACTIVE

Regardless of your age, you need regular physical activity to stay in good shape. Many people today do not exercise enough. Why is exercise important? Staying physically active can help you to:

  • Sleep well.

  • Stay mobile.

  • Maintain strong bones and muscles.

  • Maintain or achieve a healthy weight.

  • Lower your risk of suffering from depression.

  • Lower your risk of premature death.

If you do not stay physically active, you are more likely to:

  • Suffer from heart disease.

  • Suffer from type 2 diabetes.

  • Develop high blood pressure.

  • Develop high cholesterol.

  • Suffer a stroke.

The kind of physical activity that is right for you depends on your age and your health, so it would be wise to consult your doctor before beginning any new exercise program. According to various recommendations, children and adolescents should get at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity every day. Adults should get 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity every week.

Choose an activity that is fun. You might consider basketball, tennis, soccer, brisk walking, cycling, gardening, chopping wood, swimming, canoeing, jogging, or other aerobic exercise. How can you tell whether an activity is moderate or vigorous? A general guide would be that moderate activity makes you sweat, but more vigorous exercise makes it hard for you to hold a conversation while doing it.

 5 GET ENOUGH SLEEP

The amount of sleep needed varies from person to person. Most newborns sleep for 16 to 18 hours a day, toddlers about 14 hours, and preschoolers about 11 or 12. School-age children generally need at least 10 hours of sleep, adolescents perhaps 9 or 10, and adults from 7 to 8.

Getting the right amount of rest should not be considered optional. According to experts, sufficient sleep is important for:

  • Growth and development in children and teenagers.

  • Learning and retention of new information.

  • Maintaining the right balance of hormones that impact metabolism and weight.

  • Cardiovascular health.

  • Disease prevention.

Insufficient sleep has been linked to obesity, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and tragic accidents. Surely these give us good reason to want to get enough rest.

So, what can you do if you realize that you have a problem getting enough sleep?

  • Try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day.

  • Make your bedroom quiet, dark, relaxing, and neither too warm nor too cold.

  • Do not watch TV or use gadgets while in bed.

  • Make your bed as comfortable as possible.

  • Avoid heavy meals, caffeine, and alcohol before bedtime.

  • If after applying these suggestions you still suffer from insomnia or other sleep disorders—such as excessive daytime sleepiness or gasping for breath while sleeping—you may want to consult a qualified health-care professional.


    ( if you would like more info delivered to you on regular) just drop me a line. 

Things we can do now!!!!!!!

by Goodbook - March 15 at 2:23 PM

1 WATER

THE THREAT: Harmful organisms can “march” straight into your body by way of contaminated water.

YOUR DEFENSE: The best defense is to protect your water supply from contamination. If you know that your water supply is contaminated or suspect that it is, you can treat the water at home to make it safe. * Store potable water in a closed vessel, and dispense it hygienically with a clean ladle or through a tap. Never put your hands into a clean water supply. If possible, you should try to live in a community that properly disposes of human waste so that it does not contaminate local water sources.

2 FOOD

THE THREAT: Harmful organisms can be present in or on your food.

YOUR DEFENSE: Contaminated food may look fresh and nutritious. So get into the habit of thoroughly washing all fruits and vegetables. Ensure that food utensils, kitchen surfaces, and your hands are clean when preparing or serving food. Some foods require cooking at a certain temperature in order to destroy dangerous microbes. Beware of food that is discolored or has an unpleasant odor or taste—signs that an army of microorganisms could be waiting for you. Refrigerate unused food as soon as possible. Avoid preparing food for others when you are sick. *

 3 INSECTS

THE THREAT: Some insects can infect you with the harmful microorganisms that live inside them.

YOUR DEFENSE: Limit contact with disease-carrying insects by staying indoors when they are active or by wearing protective clothing, such as long sleeves and long trousers. Sleep under treated insect nets, and use personal insect repellent. Eliminate containers of stagnant water where mosquitoes could breed. *

4 ANIMALS

THE THREAT: Microbes that live harmlessly inside an animal can threaten your health. If you are bitten or scratched by a pet or another animal or exposed to its feces, you could be at risk.

YOUR DEFENSE: Some people choose to keep their animals outside the house to minimize contact with them. Wash your hands after touching a domestic animal, and avoid all contact with wild animals. If you are bitten or scratched, wash the wound thoroughly and seek a doctor’s advice. *

5 PEOPLE

THE THREAT: Some germs can invade your body by riding on tiny droplets in someone’s cough or sneeze. They can also spread through skin contact, such as hugging or shaking hands. Microorganisms from other people may lurk on such items as doorknobs, handrails, telephones, remote controls, or computer screens and keyboards.

YOUR DEFENSE: Do not share personal items, such as razors, toothbrushes, or towels. Avoid contact with body fluids from animals or from other people, including blood and products derived from blood. And do not underestimate the benefits of washing your hands thoroughly and frequently. It is perhaps the most effective way you can stop the spread of infection.

If possible, stay home when you are sick. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you cough or sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve, but not into your hands.

An ancient proverb states: “The shrewd one sees the danger and conceals himself.” (Proverbs 22:3) How true are those words today in a world plagued with potentially dangerous diseases! So inform yourself by consulting local health services, and conceal yourself from danger by practicing good hygiene. Bolster your defenses, and reduce the risk of disease!

if you would like more timely information, please drop me a message  

thanks.

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